Home arrow C++ arrow Page 4 - What`s the Address? Pointers
C++

What`s the Address? Pointers


A pointer simply points to another variable or constant. Though they have a reputation for being difficult to learn, they really are not that hard. This is fortunate, becuase pointers are very important to programming. This article explains how to create and work with pointers in C++. It is excerpted from chapter 11 of the book C++ Demystified, written by Jeff Kent (McGraw-Hill, 2004; ISBN: 0072253703).

Author Info:
By: McGraw-Hill/Osborne
Rating: 5 stars5 stars5 stars5 stars5 stars / 27
August 11, 2005
TABLE OF CONTENTS:
  1. · What`s the Address? Pointers
  2. · Assigning a Value to a Pointer
  3. · Pointer as a Variable
  4. · Incrementing a Pointer
  5. · Passing an Array Using Pointer Notation
  6. · Passing a Single Variable Using Pointer Notation
  7. · Dynamic Memory Allocation
  8. · Returning Pointers from Functions
  9. · Summary

print this article
SEARCH DEVARTICLES

What`s the Address? Pointers - Incrementing a Pointer
(Page 4 of 9 )

An important reason for declaring a variable pointer so it points to the same address as the array name is so the variable pointer can be incremented, unlike the array name which cannot be incremented because it is a constant pointer. The following

 
Figure 11-2.  Variable and constant pointers used to access array elements

program increments the variable pointer to access each succeeding element of the array:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
const int MAX = 3;
int main ()
{
  
int testScore[MAX] = {4, 7, 1};
  
int* iPtr = testScore;
  
for (int i = 0; i < MAX; i++, iPtr++)
  
{
     
cout << "The address of index " << i
        
<< " of the array is "<< iPtr << endl;
     
cout << "The value at index " << i
        
<< " of the array is "<< *iPtr << endl;
  
}
  
return 0;
}

Incrementing an integer variable increases its value by 1. However, incrementing a pointer variable increases its value by the number of bytes of its data type. This is an example of pointer arithmetic. When you run this program, the first address outputted is 0012FECC, the second 0012FED0, and the third 0012FED4. These hexadecimal addresses are 4 bytes apart because, on the compiler and operating system used by me to run this program, the integer data type takes 4 bytes.

For this reason, as shown in Figure 11-3, iPtr + 1 is not the base address plus 1, but instead is the baseaddress + 4. The same is true of testScore + 1. Consequently, the value at the second element of the array can be expressed one of four ways:

  • testScore[1];
  • *(testScore + 1);
  •  iPtr[1];
  • *(iPtr + 1);

Comparing Addresses

Addresses can be compared like any other value. The following program modifies the previous one by incrementing the variable pointer so long as the address to which

 
Figure 11-3.  Effect of incrementing or adding 1 to an address

it points is either less than or equal to the address of the last element of the array, which is &testScore[MAX - 1]:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
const int MAX = 3;
int main ()
{
   int testScore[MAX] = {4, 7, 1};
  
int* iPtr = testScore;
  
int i = 0;
  
while (iPtr <= &testScore[MAX - 1])
  
{
     
cout << "The address of index " << i
        
<< " of the array is "<< iPtr << endl;
      cout << "The value at index " << i
        
<< " of the array is "<< *iPtr << endl;
     
iPtr++;
     
i++;
  
}
   return 0;
}

As Figures 11-2 and 11-3 depict, the comparison to &testScore[MAX-1] instead could have been made to testScore + MAX – 1.

Decrementing a Pointer

The same considerations apply to decrementing a pointer, which decreases its value by the number of bytes of its data type. Decrementing a pointer can be used to step “backwards” through an array.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
const int MAX = 3;
int main ()
{
   int testScore[MAX] = {4, 7, 1};
   int* iPtr = &testScore[MAX - 1];
   int i = MAX - 1;
   while (iPtr >= &testScore[0])
   {
     
cout << "The address of index " << i
        << " of the array is "<< iPtr << endl;
      cout << "The value at index " << i
       
<< " of the array is "<< *iPtr << endl;
      iPtr--;
      i--;
  
}
   return 0;
}

The output is therefore

The address of index 2 of the array is 0012FED4
The value at index 2 of the array is 1
The address of index 1 of the array is 0012FED0
The value at index 1 of the array is 7
The address of index 0 of the array is 0012FECC
The value at index 0 of the array is 4

The key statement is

int* iPtr = &testScore[MAX - 1];

This statement has the variable pointer point to the last address in the array. That address then is decremented in the loop so that the pointer variable points to the preceding address in the array. The loop continues so long as the address pointed to by the pointer variable is not before the base address of the array.

As discussed previously, the pointer variable also could have been initialized as follows:

int* iPtr = testScore + MAX - 1;

Pointers as Function Arguments

Pointers may be passed as function arguments. Pointer notation usually is used to note that an argument is a pointer. However, if the pointer argument is the name of an array, subscript notation alternatively may be used.


blog comments powered by Disqus
C++ ARTICLES

- Intel Threading Building Blocks
- Threading Building Blocks with C++
- Video Memory Programming in Text Mode
- More Tricks to Gain Speed in Programming Con...
- Easy and Efficient Programming for Contests
- Preparing For Programming Contests
- Programming Contests: Why Bother?
- Polymorphism in C++
- Overview of Virtual Functions
- Inheritance in C++
- Extending the Basic Streams in C++
- Using Stringstreams in C++
- Custom Stream Manipulation in C++
- General Stream Manipulation in C++
- Serialize Your Class into Streams in C++

Watch our Tech Videos 
Dev Articles Forums 
 RSS  Articles
 RSS  Forums
 RSS  All Feeds
Write For Us 
Weekly Newsletter
 
Developer Updates  
Free Website Content 
Contact Us 
Site Map 
Privacy Policy 
Support 

Developer Shed Affiliates

 




© 2003-2017 by Developer Shed. All rights reserved. DS Cluster - Follow our Sitemap
Popular Web Development Topics
All Web Development Tutorials