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Keeping Up Appearances: Techniques for Retouching Images


Check out this chapter for tips on retouching images in Photoshop, improving color, adding new elements to an image or removing unwanted image elements. (From the book Inside Photoshop CS by Gary Bouton, Sams, 2004, ISBN: 0672326442.)

Author Info:
By: Sams Publishing
Rating: 5 stars5 stars5 stars5 stars5 stars / 21
August 18, 2004
TABLE OF CONTENTS:
  1. · Keeping Up Appearances: Techniques for Retouching Images
  2. · Rotate the Image
  3. · Improving Overall Color
  4. · Removing Unwanted Elements
  5. · Enhance Image Elements
  6. · Coloring the Shrubs and Vines
  7. · Adding New Elements
  8. · Adding New Landscaping Elements
  9. · Adding Ready-Made Elements
  10. · Adding Some Finishing Touches

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Keeping Up Appearances: Techniques for Retouching Images - Coloring the Shrubs and Vines
(Page 6 of 10 )

Okay, the sky color is definitely a richer spring-like hue now, but something has to be done about those brown leafless shrubs and vines. At this point, the image can't quite convince us that spring has arrived. So let's do some colorizing to lay the foundation for greener shrubs and vines.

Making Over the Shrubs and Vines

  1. On the Layers palette, the Sky Color layer should be the active layer. Press Ctrl(Command)+Shift+N to create a new layer above the Sky Color layer. In the New Layer dialog box, type Painted Shrubs for the Name, change the layer Mode to Color, and lower the Opacity to 60% (see Figure 13.14). Then click on OK.

Bouton

Figure 13.14

Create a new layer, and adjust the layer mode and opacity within the New Layer dialog box.

  1. Click the foreground color on the toolbox, choose a rich green color from the Color Picker dialog box (R:71, G:118, B:46), and click on OK.

  2. Choose the Brush tool from the toolbox. On the Options bar, choose a soft round brush (a 35-pixel brush might be about the right size). Start painting over the shrubs to the right of the steps (see Figure 13.15).

  3. Press Ctrl (Command)+Shift+N to create a new layer above the Painted Shrubs layer. In the New Layer dialog box, type Painted Vines for the name, change the layer Mode to Color, and lower the Opacity to 60% before clicking on OK.

  4. Click the foreground color on the toolbox, and choose a slightly darker green from the Color Picker dialog box (R:56, G:89, B:27). Click on OK.

Bouton

Figure 13.15

Use the settings shown here for the Brush tool, foreground color, and Layers palette options. Then paint some spring into the shrubs.

  1. The Brush tool should still be the active tool. On the Options bar, choose a hard round 3-pixel brush (Brush Mode should still be set at Normal with 100% for Opacity and Flow). Press Ctrl(Command)+ the plus key to zoom in close enough to see the vines that wrap around the house bricks (around 200300% zoom level will work well). Use the small hard brush to paint over the vines on the house. Hold down the spacebar to toggle to the Hand tool when you need to scroll to a different area as you work. This job may seem rather tedious, and the effect won't be obvious at first, but be assured that completing this step is worth taking the time and the trouble. It lays a good foundation for the vines and prepares the image for the elements you will be adding later.

  2. Press Ctrl(Command)+S to save your work. Keep the image and Photoshop open.

When you're finished with this painting part of the project, grab some refreshment. After all, hand painting all those vines was hard work, and you deserve a break.

Now that the basic foundation of the image is complete, the next steps will involve adding the various spring elements. Oh, what fun it is to play virtual landscaper!


Insider - If you prefer not to take the time to paint in all the vines, a file has been provided for your convenience with all the hard work already done for you. Open vines.psd from the Examples\Chap13 folder on the companion CD. On the Layers palette, the Painted Vines layer is the one you will concentrate on. Don't worry about the Vines layer at this point (which is why it is hidden). Position both documents so that you can easily see each image window in the workspace. If necessary, press Ctrl(Command)+ the minus key to lower the zoom level for both documents. Click the title bar of the vines.psd document so that this is the active document. Hold down the Shift key, and drag the Painted Vines layer from the Layers palette into the 219Burnet.psd document window. When you hold down the Shift key, the layer will center itself perfectly within the document window. If necessary, press V to switch to the Move tool, and use the arrow keys to fine-tune the positioning of this Painted Vines layer.


This chapter is from Inside Photoshop CS, by Gary Bouton (Sams, 2004, ISBN: 0672326442). Check it out at your favorite bookstore today. Buy this book now.


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