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Replication: SQL Server 2000 - Part 2


In this second, and final, installment, Mahesh gives us a step-by-step approach on how to implement replication across a network using SQL Server 2000.

Author Info:
By: Mahesh Kodli
Rating: 5 stars5 stars5 stars5 stars5 stars / 104
November 13, 2003
TABLE OF CONTENTS:
  1. · Replication: SQL Server 2000 - Part 2
  2. · Getting Started: Step-By-Step
  3. · Getting Started: Step-By-Step, Cont'd.
  4. · Code: Stored Procedure
  5. · Getting Started: Step-By-Step, Cont'd.
  6. · General Replication Performance Tips
  7. · Conclusion

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Replication: SQL Server 2000 - Part 2 - General Replication Performance Tips
(Page 6 of 7 )

Filtering Published Data

Replication can be tuned to yield better performance, and one of the ways to achieve this is filtering the data before publishing; in other words, give subscribers what they want to see and play with.

Replication facilitates this by splitting it vertically/horizontally.  By distributing partitions of data to different Subscribers, you can:

  • Minimize the amount of data sent over the network.
  • Reduce the amount of storage space required at the Subscriber.
  • Customize publications and applications based on individual Subscriber requirements.
  • Reduce conflicts because the different data partitions can be sent to different Subscribers.

In addition, the following are some tips which will help to yield better performance:

  • When running SQL Server replication on a dedicated server, consider setting the minimum memory amount for SQL Server to use from the default value of 0 to a value closer to what SQL Server normally uses.
  • Don’t publish more data than you need. Try to use Row filter and Column filter options wherever possible as explained above.
  • For best performance, avoid replicating columns in your publications that include TEXT, NTEXT or IMAGE data types.
  • Avoid creating triggers on tables that contain subscribed data.
  • Applications that are updated frequently are not good candidates for database replication.
  • Distribute the workload into more than one SQL server using replication.
  • Plan for the type of replication to be used before the database design, because the type of replication used will, to a certain extent, guide your database design.

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