HOME > RSS Feeds > Web Services
Add To:  Subscribe with My Yahoo!  Subscribe with Google  Subscribe in NewsGator Online  Subscribe in Rojo  Subscribe with Pluck RSS reader  Subscribe with Bloglines  Add to AOL Subscribe to this feed using your favorite reader  

 
Dealing with Loose Coupling in a Service-Oriented Architecture
In this conclusion to a two-part article series on loose coupling in SOA, we wrap up our discussion of the forms of loose coupling, and explain how to handle its complexity. This article is excerpted from chapter four of the book SOA in Practice: The Art of Distributed System Design, written by Nicolai Josuttis (O'Reilly, 2008; ISBN: 0596529554). Copyright 2008 O'Reilly Media, Inc. All rights reserved. Used with permission from the publisher. Available from booksellers or direct from O'Reilly Media.

Loose Coupling in a Service-Oriented Architecture
If you're looking for an introduction to one of the key concepts behind building a service-oriented architecture (SOA), you've come to the right place. This two-part article explains why loose coupling is important to SOA, the forms of loose coupling, and how to deal with it. It is excerpted from chapter four of the book SOA in Practice: The Art of Distributed System Design, written by Nicolai Josuttis (O'Reilly, 2008; ISBN: 0596529554). Copyright 2008 O'Reilly Media, Inc. All rights reserved. Used with permission from the publisher. Available from booksellers or direct from O'Reilly Media.

Safety, Idempotence, and the Resource-Oriented Architecture
In this conclusion to a four-part series on the resource-oriented architecture, you will learn (among other things) about safety and idempotence, and why they matter. This article is excerpted from chapter four of the book RESTful Web Services, written by Leonard Richardson and Sam Ruby (O'Reilly, 2008; ISBN: 0596529260). Copyright 2008 O'Reilly Media, Inc. All rights reserved. Used with permission from the publisher. Available from booksellers or direct from O'Reilly Media.

The Resource-Oriented Architecture in Action
In this third part of a four-part article series on the resource-oriented architecture, you will learn how servers figure out which resource a client wants, the four basic things you can do to a resource online, and more. This article is excerpted from chapter four of the book RESTful Web Services, written by Leonard Richardson and Sam Ruby (O'Reilly, 2008; ISBN: 0596529260). Copyright 2008 O'Reilly Media, Inc. All rights reserved. Used with permission from the publisher. Available from booksellers or direct from O'Reilly Media.

Features of the Resource-Oriented Architecture
In this second part of a four-part series on Representational State Transfer (REST), you will learn about two of the most important features of the Resource-Oriented Architecture (ROA). This article is excerpted from chapter four of the book RESTful Web Services, written by Leonard Richardson and Sam Ruby (O'Reilly, 2008; ISBN: 0596529260). Copyright 2008 O'Reilly Media, Inc. All rights reserved. Used with permission from the publisher. Available from booksellers or direct from O'Reilly Media.

The Resource-Oriented Architecture
If you have an interest in building web sites that can be used by machines, keep reading. In this four-part article series, you'll learn about the architecture behind Representational State Transfer (REST) and how to make use of it. It is excerpted from chapter four of the book RESTful Web Services, written by Leonard Richardson and Sam Ruby (O'Reilly, 2008; ISBN: 0596529260). Copyright 2008 O'Reilly Media, Inc. All rights reserved. Used with permission from the publisher. Available from booksellers or direct from O'Reilly Media.

Getting Started with Flex
In this discussion, I will focus on the basics of Flex, a web development framework based on Flash. The first section will be about the whys and wherefores of Flex. The second section will cover the steps involving the development of a Flex-based application. In the third and fourth sections, a real world application using Flex will be developed.

Automated Billing and Faxing for the Web
If you do a lot of payment processing through PayPal, you can save some serious time by automating the process. This article will show you how. It is excerpted from chapter six of the book Real World Web Services, written by Will Iverson (O'Reilly; ISBN: 059600642X). Copyright 2006 O'Reilly Media, Inc. All rights reserved. Used with permission from the publisher. Available from booksellers or direct from O'Reilly Media.

An Introduction to Web Services
Web services are becoming more and more popular. If you would like to learn what they are and how you can develop and deploy them, keep reading.

The Foundations of Web Services: From Novice to Expert
A web service is a way to make applications inter-operate across different programming languages, platforms and operating systems in order to share the data quickly and efficiently. In this series of articles, I will take you through the basic to advanced concepts for this subject. We will work together on technical aspects of web services for building, deploying, finding and debugging web services.

Web Services Reengineering: Finishing Touches
In the previous five articles, we have reengineered the web services for a sample website and business. In this sixth and final part, we pull it all together. It is excerpted from chapter 12 of Building Web Services with Java: Making sense of XML, SOAP, WSDL, and UDDI, written by Steve Graham et al. (Sams; ISBN: 0672326418).

Fault Handling with Web Services
Last week, we looked at the assign and other basic activities, and studied flow. This week, we'll be examining more sturctured activities, and fault handling. This article, the fifth in a six-part series, is excerpted from chapter 12 of Building Web Services with Java: Making sense of XML, SOAP, WSDL, and UDDI, written by Steve Graham et al. (Sams; ISBN: 0672326418).

Flow and Web Services
Last week, we looked at process lifecycles. This week, we'll take a look at the assign and other basic activities, and study flow. This article, the fourth in a series, is excerpted from chapter 12 of Building Web Services with Java: Making sense of XML, SOAP, WSDL, and UDDI, written by Steve Graham et al. (Sams; ISBN: 0672326418).

Process Lifecycles and Web Services
Last week, we began taking a look at business processes and their role in constructing web services. This week, we will look at process lifecycles, invoking and providing web services, and more. This article, the third in a series, is excerpted from chapter 12 of Building Web Services with Java: Making sense of XML, SOAP, WSDL, and UDDI, written by Steve Graham et al. (Sams; ISBN: 672326418).

Business Processes and Web Services
Last week we introduced you to the idea of using existing Web services to build more complex web services. This week, we're going to take a closer look at business processes and their role in constructing Web services. This article is excerpted from chapter 12 of Building Web Services with Java: Making sense of XML, SOAP, WSDL, and UDDI, written by Steve Graham et al. (Sams; ISBN: 0672326418).

Orchestrating Web Services
You can use existing Web services to construct more complex Web services. It involves a certain amount of choreography, however. This article gets you started. It is excerpted from chapter 12 of Building Web Services with Java: Making sense of XML, SOAP, WSDL, and UDDI, written by Steve Graham et al. (Sams; ISBN: 0672326418).

Notifications and Resources in the WS-Resource Framework
This article concludes our discussion of the WS-Resource Framework, a set of proposed standards that formalizes the relationship between Web services and state. In this part, we finish covering notifications and go into greater detail about resources. It is excerpted from chapter 8 of the book Building Web Services with Java: Making sense of XML, SOAP, WSDL, and UDDI, written by Steve Graham et al. (Sams; ISBN: 0672326418).

WS Notification and WS Topics in the WS Resources Framework
This article continues our discussion of the WS-Resource Framework, a set of proposed standards that formalizes the relationship between Web services and state. In this part, the third of a multi-part series, we cover the use of notifications and topics. It is excerpted from chapter 8 of the book Building Web Services with Java: Making sense of XML, SOAP, WSDL, and UDDI, written by Steve Graham et al. (Sams; ISBN: 0672326418).

Introducing the Implied Resource Pattern
This article continues our discussion of the WS-Resource Framework, a set of proposed standards that formalizes the relationship between Web services and state. In this part, the second of a multi-part series, we start with the implied resource pattern. It is excerpted from chapter 8 of the book Building Web Services with Java: Making sense of XML, SOAP, WSDL, and UDDI, written by Steve Graham et al. (Sams; ISBN: 0672326418).

Web Services and Stateful Resources
The WS-Resource Framework is a set of proposed standards that formalizes the relationship between Web services and state. If you do anything involving the Web and persistent data, you know how important this is. This article, the first of a multi-part series, examines that framework. It is excerpted from chapter 8 of the book Building Web Services with Java: Making sense of XML, SOAP, WSDL, and UDDI, written by Steve Graham et al. (Sams; ISBN: 0672326418).