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Open XML Finally Supported by MS Office
It's about time – and it happened so quietly that it went all but unnoticed in some quarters. But last month, Jim Thatcher, Principal Program Manager Lead for Office Standards, announced that Office 2013 would support two additional formats: Strict Open XML and Open Document Format (ODF) 1.2. The move closes one front in a years-long tech war between proprietary vendors and open source advocates.

XML Features Added to Two Systems
Adobe and DocVerify clearly understand the importance of XML. Their latest products now allow you to use this structured markup language in more ways in your documents. Content creators and curators, rejoice.

Using Regions with XSL Formatting Objects
In my last article on XSL Formatting Objects (XSL-FO), we took a look at the basics. We created a simple page master with one body region and then wrote some text onto the page. However, XSL-FO offers a lot more functionality and flexibility. In this article, we'll take a closer look at regions.

Using XSL Formatting Objects
If you need to format content not just for web pages, but for pages that will actually be printed out, keep reading. There is a technology called XSL Formatting Objects that can help you get the job done. In this article, we'll explain how to use it to format your content appropriately.

More Schematron Features
In my last two articles, I covered the basics of Schematron—enough of it to create a basic schema with assertions, rules and patterns. However, there is more to Schematron than was covered in those articles, and some of Schematron's other features are very useful and worth mentioning. In this article, we'll take a look at more of Schematron's features, delving deeper into the Schematron schema language.

Schematron Patterns and Validation
In the last article, we grouped assertions into rules. As you know, each rule has its own context that it acts upon. So, grouping assertions into a rule provides a way to organize assertions that apply to the same elements. In this article, we'll start by explaining patterns, which takes organization to a new level.

Using Schematron
If you use XML schema languages, you should consider Schematron. This powerful rule-based language lets you make distinctions which other languages find difficult or even impossible to handle. Best of all, you can use it in conjunction with other schema languages. This is the first part of a three-part series.

Datatypes and More in RELAX NG
Welcome to the third part of a three-part series on RELAX NG. In this part, we will discuss datatypes, the grammar element, and creating named patterns. That's a lot of ground to cover, so let's get started.

Providing Options in RELAX NG
XML schemas don't have to be rigid. Sometimes, it's best to provide flexibility and allow the author of XML documents to make choices. In this second part of a three-part article, we'll make some modifications to the schema we created in the first part, and learn how to make some things optional.

An Introduction to RELAX NG
RELAX NG is not a capitalized misspelling of something you probably get to do all too rarely as a busy programmer and web designer. If you use XML to any great degree, you'll want to take a close look at it. It can help make your life as a web developer easier, allowing you to relax a little more. Keep reading to learn what it is, and the advantages to using it. This is the first part of a three-part series.

Path, Predicates, and XQuery
In this conclusion to a three-part series on path expressions, you'll learn about complex predicates, dynamic paths, and more. This article is excerpted from chapter four of the book XQuery, written by Priscilla Walmsley (O'Reilly, 2007; ISBN: 0596006349). Copyright © 2007 O'Reilly Media, Inc. All rights reserved. Used with permission from the publisher. Available from booksellers or direct from O'Reilly Media.

Using Predicates with XQuery
In this second part of a three-part series on extracting information from XML documents, you'll learn how to use predicates in path expressions. This article is excerpted from chapter four of the book XQuery, written by Priscilla Walmsley (O'Reilly, 2007; ISBN: 0596006349). Copyright © 2007 O'Reilly Media, Inc. All rights reserved. Used with permission from the publisher. Available from booksellers or direct from O'Reilly Media.

Navigating Input Documents Using Paths
If you want to learn how to extract information from XML documents, you'll want to read this three-part series. It covers path expressions. This article is excerpted from chapter four of the book XQuery, written by Priscilla Walmsley (O'Reilly, 2007; ISBN: 0596006349). Copyright © 2007 O'Reilly Media, Inc. All rights reserved. Used with permission from the publisher. Available from booksellers or direct from O'Reilly Media.

XML Basics
When I first heard about XML, I thought it was something similar to HTML. Needless to say, I was wrong. XML and HTML were designed with different goals. XML was designed to describe data and HTML was designed to display data. In this article we will try to learn some basics about XML. Then we will learn about DTD and XML schemas.

Introduction to XPath
According to the W3C, XPath is a language for addressing parts of an XML document, designed to be used by both XSLT and XPointer. In this article we will learn about XPath, XPath expressions and how to use XPath in .NET and Java.

Simple Web Syndication with RSS 2.0
RSS was originally created in 1999 by Netscape as a channel description framework for their My Netscape Network. MNN was a portal system that allowed end users to selectively view new content from their choice of content providers. RSS was created as a means of gathering that content. Since its creation, RSS has been updated and expanded to handle a much wider range of content with a far broader range of uses.

Java UI Design with an IDE
There are at least two ways to approach building an application that combines Java and XML. One involves using a toolkit; that was covered in last week's article. In this second of two parts, you'll learn what is available for the second approach: using an integrated development environment.

UI Design with Java and XML Toolkits
XML has revolutionized application UI design in recent years. With a cunning blend of XML and script languages such as JavaScript, rich, aesthetically pleasing applications can be quickly constructed with ease. We've looked at Widgets and XUL as two examples of this in the past and now, I'm going to take a look at some of the innovative Java UI toolkits that implement XML as an integral mechanism for application II design. Please note, this is the first part of a two-part article.

Displaying ADO Retrieved Data with XML Islands
An XML data island is a piece of well-formed XML embedded into an HTML file. This article will show you how to retrieve data in an XML format from a database using ADO; you will also learn how to bind this data into an HTML document.

Widget Walkthrough
The first half of this tutorial introduced you to making a rudimentary but functional widget of the sort you can find on Yahoo's site since its purchase of Konfabulator. In this article, you'll add the finishing touches to increase its functionality.