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Java Too Insecure, Says Microsoft Researcher
Microsoft Malware Protection Center researcher Matt Oh has been sounding the alarm about Java-based malware. He says that the situation is continuing to get worse. The problem goes far beyond Windows, too.

Google Beats Oracle in Java Ruling
At the heart of Oracle's lawsuit against Google over cloning 37 Java APIs lies one question: can APIs be copyrighted? To answer that question, one needs to understand the nature of APIs. Judge William Alsup, in ruling in favor of Google, used both analogy and Java code he wrote himself. Millions of Java programmers can sigh in relief.

Deploying Multiple Java Applets as One
In this conclusion to a three-part series covering the three different kinds of deployment frameworks you can use with Java games, you'll learn how to deploy multiple Java applets as if they were all one applet. This article is excerpted from chapter two of Advanced Java Game Programming, written by David Wallace Croft (Apress; ISBN: 1590591232).

Deploying Java Applets
In this second part of a three-part series on using Java with deployment frameworks, you will learn how to deploy applets in a self-contained manner, and what they are and are not typically permitted to do once they are downloaded. This article is excerpted from chapter two of Advanced Java Game Programming, written by David Wallace Croft (Apress; ISBN: 1590591232).

Understanding Deployment Frameworks
Java games can be deployed using various types of deployment frameworks. This article helps you understand the three different kinds of deployment frameworks, and shows you how to deploy your games to all three types without having to recompile your code. It is excerpted from chapter two of Advanced Java Game Programming, written by David Wallace Croft (Apress; ISBN: 1590591232).

Database Programming in Java Using JDBC
An application that does not persist its data in a database is a rarity. Programming languages reflect this trend. That's why all languages provide a robust and flexible library for database access. Java is no exception.

Extension Interfaces and SAX
In this conclusion to a three-part article, we look at extension interfaces, XML filters, and more as they relate to the Simple API for XML (SAX). This article is excerpted from chapter four of the book Java and XML, Third Edition, written by Brett McLaughlin and Justin Edelson (O'Reilly, 2006; ISBN: 059610149X). Copyright 2006 O'Reilly Media, Inc. All rights reserved. Used with permission from the publisher. Available from booksellers or direct from O'Reilly Media.

Entities, Handlers and SAX
Picking up from where we left off yesterday, we'll take a look at entities and handlers in SAX. This article is excerpted from chapter four of the book Java and XML, Third Edition, written by Brett McLaughlin and Justin Edelson (O'Reilly, 2006; ISBN: 059610149X). Copyright 2006 O'Reilly Media, Inc. All rights reserved. Used with permission from the publisher. Available from booksellers or direct from O'Reilly Media.

Advanced SAX
This article, the first of three parts, takes a look at the Simple API for XML (SAX) that goes beyond basic parsing and content handling. It is excerpted from chapter four of the book Java and XML, Third Edition, written by Brett McLaughlin and Justin Edelson (O'Reilly, 2006; ISBN: 059610149X). Copyright 2006 O'Reilly Media, Inc. All rights reserved. Used with permission from the publisher. Available from booksellers or direct from O'Reilly Media.

Conversions and Java Print Streams
In the conclusion to this three-part article, we'll discuss data and time conversions, character conversions, and more. This article is excerpted from chapter seven of Java I/O, Second Edition, written by Elliotte Rusty Harold (O'Reilly, 2006; ISBN: 0596527500). Copyright 2006 O'Reilly Media, Inc. All rights reserved. Used with permission from the publisher. Available from booksellers or direct from O'Reilly Media.

Formatters and Java Print Streams
Last week, we discussed Java print streams, concluding with the format method and formatter objects. This week, we pick up from where we left off. This is the second part of a three-part sereis. It is excerpted from chapter seven of Java I/O, Second Edition, written by Elliotte Rusty Harold (O'Reilly, 2006; ISBN: 0596527500). Copyright 2006 O'Reilly Media, Inc. All rights reserved. Used with permission from the publisher. Available from booksellers or direct from O'Reilly Media.

Java Print Streams
The first two output streams that Java programmers encounter are usually instances of the java.io.Printstream class. If you want to learn more about print streams, keep reading; this is the first part of a three-part series on the topic. It is excerpted from chapter seven of Java I/O, Second Edition, written by Elliotte Rusty Harold (O'Reilly, 2006; ISBN: 0596527500). Copyright 2006 O'Reilly Media, Inc. All rights reserved. Used with permission from the publisher. Available from booksellers or direct from O'Reilly Media.

Wildcards, Arrays, and Generics in Java
In this conclusion to a five-part series, you will learn about wildcards, arrays, and more. This article was excerpted from chapter eight of the book Learning Java, third edition, written by Patrick Niemeyer and Jonathan Knudsen (O'Reilly; ISBN: 0596008732). Copyright 2006 O'Reilly Media, Inc. All rights reserved. Used with permission from the publisher. Available from booksellers or direct from O'Reilly Media.

Wildcards and Generic Methods in Java
In this part of our continuing discussion of generics in Java, we'll learn how to use wildcards, then move on to generic methods. This article was excerpted from chapter eight of the book Learning Java, third edition, written by Patrick Niemeyer and Jonathan Knudsen (O'Reilly; ISBN: 0596008732). Copyright 2006 O'Reilly Media, Inc. All rights reserved. Used with permission from the publisher. Available from booksellers or direct from O'Reilly Media.

Finishing the Project: Java Web Development in Eclipse and Tomcat
Last week, I introduced you to some of the fundamental concepts you need for working with Java web components. For this project we'll be working with JSP and servlets. I walked you through getting the appropriate downloads installed and setting up your work space. We stopped after just creating the web project. In this part, we will add our content, including HTML, JSP, and servlets.

Generics and Limitations in Java
Last week we began discussing generics and relationships in Java. This week, we'll learn about parameter type limitations, bounds, wildcards, and more. This article, the third in a series, was excerpted from chapter eight of the book Learning Java, third edition, written by Patrick Niemeyer and Jonathan Knudsen (O'Reilly; ISBN: 0596008732). Copyright 2006 O'Reilly Media, Inc. All rights reserved. Used with permission from the publisher. Available from booksellers or direct from O'Reilly Media.

Getting Started with Java Web Development in Eclipse and Tomcat
This is the first part of a series of Java Web development tutorials. It is intended to warm you up by introducing two fundamental Java web components, JSP and Servlet, and helping you prepare your development and deployment environments for the next steps.

Generics and Relationships in Java
Last week we began our discussion of generics in Java. This week we will delve into relationships. This article was excerpted from chapter eight of the book Learning Java, third edition, written by Patrick Niemeyer and Jonathan Knudsen (O'Reilly; ISBN: 0596008732). Copyright 2006 O'Reilly Media, Inc. All rights reserved. Used with permission from the publisher. Available from booksellers or direct from O'Reilly Media.

Generics in Java
Generics are the most important change to the Java language in a long time, possibly since it was created. They make reusable Java code easier to write and read. This article, the first in a series, was excerpted from chapter eight of the book Learning Java, third edition, written by Patrick Niemeyer and Jonathan Knudsen (O'Reilly; ISBN: 0596008732). Copyright 2006 O'Reilly Media, Inc. All rights reserved. Used with permission from the publisher. Available from booksellers or direct from O'Reilly Media.

Java 2D in the Real World
Yesterday we discussed the Java 2D API: how it works and how to use it. Today we're going to get our hands dirty with code as we study a real world application.